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Quality & Innovation in Healthcare
 

Infections Drop 69 Percent with CUROS and Compliance  

Posted by   on 08-January-2016 
Infections Drop 69 Percent with  CUROS and Compliance

PRESS RELEASE  A six month study into staff compliance when using Vygon’s Curos Port Protectors – a passive disinfection device - has shown a 69 per cent drop in patients’ Catheter Related Bloodstream Infections. 

PRESS RELEASE 

A six month study into staff compliance when using Vygon’s Curos Port Protectors – a passive disinfection device - has shown a 69 per cent drop in patients’ Catheter Related Bloodstream Infections. 

The study involved more than 1,000 patients on four wards across two hospitals and was carried out by Corinne Cameron-Watson a Senior Infection Control Nurse at the Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. 

The trial period saw Catheter Related Bloodstream Infection rates drop from 26 cases previously to just eight, when staff compliance was 80 per cent or more. 

Corinne said: “The study results indicated that a high compliance rate by staff has a positive correlation on the effectiveness of Curos, a passive disinfection device. This has also been shown in three peer review studies in America (1).” 

Patients on the Oncology, Acute Care of the Elderly, Critical Care and Surgical wards at Queen’s Hospital, Romford, and the King George Hospital in Goodmayes, Ilford, were involved in the study and there was intensive staff training prior to and during the study. Regular audits were also made, as well as ongoing training, maintenance and support during the trial. 

Disinfection wipes used for needle-free devices were removed from all trial areas and Curos was incorporated in the trial wards ANTT protocols. For six months Curos was used on all needle free devices including Central Venous Catheters, Peripheral Intravenous Catheters and Arterial Lines. 

Currently in the UK, all IV needle-free access devices are required to be disinfected before every access. EPIC3 (2) guidelines recommend ‘Scrubbing the Hub’ for a minimum of 15 seconds. Product manufacturers and suppliers advise that the disinfectant should then be left to dry for a recommended 30 seconds. 

Corinne said: “Current practice relies on the caregiver using a consistent, active disinfection technique and also ensuring the correct time is given to both the scrubbing of the needle-free device and the drying or ‘kill time’. This is a multiple step approach and is open to variation in the way each carer disinfects the needle-free device. 

“The study gave clear evidence that when used correctly the passive infection technique provided by Curos led to lower rates of infection than the method of active disinfection. 

“The important issues when using Curos are thorough and ongoing education and training, and maintenance and supply of stock levels. Based on this study I have now submitted a business case at Barking, Havering and Redbridge that Curos is used as standard in our hospitals.” 

If you would like to know more about the study contact Corinne on Corinne.ccw@googlemail.com 

References: 1. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). Marshall et al. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 2014;35:753-771 

2. EPIC3: National Evidence-Based Guidelines for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in NHS Hospitals in England H.P. Lovedaya J.A. Wilsona, R.J. Pratta, M. Golsorkhia, A. Tinglea, A. Baka,J. Brownea, J. Prietob, M. Wilcox. 

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